Approaches to Painting

Painting 2

 

 

U.C. Berkeley, Painting Department, 2010

 

California College of Art, Drawing and Painting Department, 2008

 

Painting 1

 

 

 

California College of Art, Drawing and Painting Department, 2010

 

Points of Penetration: The Grotesque Body and Humor in Art

 

 

(Laughter)

“Thatʼs disgusting!”

(Laughter)

 

This course focuses on historical and contemporary definitions of humor and the grotesque, their overlap, and their respective constructions as social and cultural categories, through artistic, philosophical, psychoanalytic, literary, feminist and post-colonial perspectives. Our sources will include readings, artistsʼ practices ranging from painting to performance, pre- to post-20th century, popular culture and the media.

 

California College of Art, Graduate Fine Art, 2008

California College of Arts, Visual and Critical Studies, 2010

You Said It Wouldn't Hurt: Perspectives on the Body and Trauma in Contemporary Art

 

This course focuses on historical and contemporary definitions of the body and trauma, and their use in contemporary painting, performance and installation art. We will draw on aesthetic, sociological, philosophical, psychoanalytic, literary, feminist and post-colonial perspectives in our examination of theories of phenomenology, perception, embodiment, subjectivity, and collective memory. Our sources will include readings, recent artistsʼ practices, popular culture and the media.

 

 

California College of Art, Graduate Fine Art, 2009

 

Seeing Through Empire: World Fairs, Ethnographic Display and Constructing Otherness

 

 

The Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in London opened on May 1, 1851 and marked the birth of the international exhibition movement. This course will examine the birth and evolution of the World Fair as a symbolic universe which offered viewer/ participants a cohesive explanatory model for social experience locating the exhibition’s ideological functions within imperial policies domestically and abroad. The course will be comprised of three overlapping areas of inquiry: the history of imperial cultural practice and policy in the form of the World Fair, the blending of science and art in the creation of racial categories, taxonomy and ethnographic displays, culminating with a consideration of it’s contemporary legacy within a globalized context. In exploring the legacy of the World Fair, possibilities for consideration include the internal and external structures of International Art Biennials and their compartmentalization into national pavilions, ethnographic impulses imbedded in the marketing and reception of non-European artists, contemporary Natural History, Ethnographic and Heritage Museums and tourism. Our research will be informed by artistic, philosophical,historical, psychoanalytic, anthropological and post-colonial perspectives.

 

Proposal for Course

Contingency of Culture:  Art, Politics and Possibility

 

 

Divided into 3 time periods, pre-20th Century, 20th Century and the 21st Century, and understood within the overlapping frames of Imperialism, Modernity and Globalization, the course will begin by tracing the transition of private European collections to the birth of the first modern public museums in the 18th and 19th Centuries. The 19th Century marks the birth of the first International exhibition, in the form of the World Fair. It served as a symbolic universe offering a cohesive explanatory model for social experience and locates the exhibitionʼs ideological functions within imperial policies domestically and abroad.

 

San Francisco Art Institute, Exhibitions and Museum Studies, 2009

© 2017 by Rajkamal Kahlon